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Words in action in Mexico

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Coming together for adult literacy: Earlier this month, TransCanada and Mexican officials signed an agreement to support an adult literacy project in six states. The signatories included, from left to right: Lorena Patterson, TransCanada’s Director of Corporate Affairs in Mexico; Omar Fayad, Governor of the State of Hidalgo; Aurelio Nuño, Mexican Minister of Education; Mauricio López Velázquez, General Director of the National Institute for Adult Education (INEA).

“With this agreement, we intertwine the efforts of the government with the social responsibility and commitment of (TransCanada).”
– Aurelio Nuño, Minister of Education

New partnership tackles adult literacy

In a country where four per cent of men and six per cent of women over the age of 15 are illiterate, TransCanada is taking steps to help improve adult education in Mexico.

Earlier this month, TransCanada signed an agreement with the National Institute for Adult Education (INEA) and the Ministry of Education (SEP) in Mexico to support a literacy project in the states of Hidalgo, Veracruz, Puebla, San Luis Potosi, Queretaro and Guanajuato.

The company’s existing pipeline network – as well as projects under construction and in development – passes by some communities where TransCanada has recognized a need for assistance.

In the city of Tuxpan, Veracruz, up to 55 per cent of the population experiences some form of educational lag – referring to adults who are illiterate or have never finished primary or middle school.

Tuxpan also happens to sit along the route of the company’s 800-kilometre (497-mile) Sur de Texas-Tuxpan Pipeline as well as the 250-kilometre (155-mile) Tuxpan-Tula Pipeline.

Aurelio Nuño, the Mexican Minister of Education, said, “I thank TransCanada for its commitment to education in Mexico. With this agreement, we intertwine the efforts of the government with the social responsibility and commitment of such an important company, which will allow us to eradicate the educational lag in many ways.”

Closing in on the educational lag

TransCanada’s funding will help improve school infrastructure in the communities, such as through the purchase of new computers or meeting transportation needs of adult students.

As a result of the program, some people from remote communities will have access to education for the first time in their lives.

As a result, some people from remote communities will have access to education for the first time in their lives.

Mauricio López Velázquez, General Director of INEA, said that the positive impact of the partnership on communities should not be underestimated.

“Thanks to TransCanada and the states that will be benefiting, this effort will allow us to fight against educational lag and continue to grow together, so that each person who finishes their studies strengthens their community,” said Mauricio.

Lorena Patterson, TransCanada’s Director of Corporate Affairs in Mexico, said not only will the partnership provide new educational opportunities for communities, but it will also support economic growth in the most remote areas.

“Through our projects and work in surrounding communities, we aim to generate positive change that improves people’s lives wherever they are,” she said.

Collaborating on education

This is not the first time TransCanada has supported educational programs in Mexico.

Last year, TransCanada funded and led an initiative supported by the government of the State of Chihuahua – home of the company’s El Encino-Topolobampo pipeline – aimed at training young professionals to become the next generation of pipeline engineers.

Twenty Mexican students participated in a semester-long pipeline specialization program at the University of Calgary (U of C) – with the intent of applying their new skills and knowledge in the developing energy industry of their home country.

Recently, TransCanada welcomed 18 more students from the states of Chihuahua, Veracruz, Hidalgo and Puebla, who are starting their studies in the fall 2016 program at the U of C.

Related links:

Dreams realized in some of Mexico’s poorest indigenous communities
Preparing Mexico’s pipeline engineers

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